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McGregor contract within a year of his last five-year deal

103

Callum McGregor was given his chance at Celtic in 2014 by Ronny Deila, as an inverted right-winger.  After a promising opening few months in that role, his form slipped and he looked no different than the bevvy of wider players who passed through the club in the years before and after this.

A year later, with Scott Brown unavailable, Callum played in his now-accustomed deep lying midfield role in a Europa League game against Ajax.  I remember the “playing three wingers” horror when we heard the team, as Gary Mackay-Steven and James Forrest were also named in the starting line-up. We lost the game to a late goal, but McGregor flourished in his central role and opened the scoring.

Since then he has grown into Celtic’s metronome.  Last season he played more minutes professional football than any player on the planet.  Twice in the last year, when moved to left back, Celtic conceded control of midfield and suffered defeat.  We need either Callum McGregor, or we need someone with the same tactical discipline to do exactly the job Callum does.

In signing a five-year contract, he has committed himself to Celtic until he turns 31.  By then he will very likely be one of the most decorated players in Scottish football history and possibly Celtic captain.  This deal comes just 11 months after the player last signed a five-year contract.  It is undoubtedly a shot across the bows of those who might want to tempt him to the Midlands.  The player is demonstrably happy at Celtic and is intent on staying.

The question now, for Callum, is can he step up in the Eternal City?

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  1. Children of the Troubles is at 9.35pm on RTÉ1, on Monday November 4th

     

     

    ——————————————

     

     

    dont read this if your not interested, but i admit i had a few lip trembles and sharp intakes of breath reading the article.

     

     

    Who shot my 14-year-old brother Peter in 1973?

     

    My older brother was shot dead on the Falls Road in Belfast. I’m still searching for answers

     

     

    https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/who-shot-my-14-year-old-brother-peter-in-1973-1.4062894?mode=amp

  2. SAINT STIVS on 6TH NOVEMBER 2019 7:15 PM

     

    Children of the Troubles

     

    ……………….

     

    Stivs ,Another tragic sorrowful tale from the troubles,don’t know how the families coped.

  3. To good to be left at bottom of last page

     

     

     

    MATT STEWART on 6TH NOVEMBER 2019 7:14 PM

     

    Just got a text frae ma brother,,,,,,seems that Celtic fans have outwitted the Lazio ultras. Planned gang attacks by the home fans bent on violence have been thwarted by the simple tactic of all Bhoys and Ghirls switching off their mobile phones.

     

     

    This has prevented any Roman charges.

     

     

    Hail Hail

     

     

    Matt

  4. and something completely different

     

     

    Cathkin Park Ltd Retweeted

     

     

    Highland__Paddy

     

     

     

    @Highland__paddy

     

    May 22

     

    More

     

    A week after beating Rangers 7-1 in the League Cup Final in 1957 , Celtic line up before their game against Third Lanark and display the trophy.

     

     

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D7K3MJqWwAALPin.jpg

  5. CBN,

     

     

    Good wee summary as always sir.

     

     

    A more pragmatic Celtic, under Neil, may consider Taylor the go-to in those tight european matches where small errors defensively from Boli (who I like a lot) may cost us the game.

  6. poppies is it,

     

     

    Hero Corporal Angus Honoured 1914-1918

     

     

    Homecoming party for wounded Scottish hero and man whose life he saved

     

     

    Description

     

    Exact location unknown – Scotland.

     

     

    World War One. Decorations. Homecoming party for wounded Scottish hero. Lance Corporal William Angus; Victoria Cross medal winner; shown with Lieutenant James Martin; whose life Angus saved. The men wear Highland Light Infantry berets with checked borders; Angus has eye patch .. Older men in civilian clothes stand behind them. Shot of the soldiers; along with other men; women; children (hero’s family); heading into building; banner hangs over entrance: ‘East; West; Hame’s Best’. Back view of Lt. Martin; and older man in bowler helping the hero to walk; as he seems to be temporarily lame. One man carries something in a large frame; a certificate or something. Some kind of ivy (or laurel) leaves strung up in festive way.

     

     

    https://www.britishpathe.com/video/hero-corporal-angus-honoured/query/celtic

  7. Melbourne Mick on

    Hello again all you young rebels.

     

     

    From a wet and windy Melbourne morning, no beach today.

     

    Just had a look at CTV there and i must say the Griff is looking

     

    very trim, hope we can get him some game time, be like a

     

    new signing ,only it’s one we know for definite who can perform.

     

    H.H . Mick

  8. An Dun

     

     

    Good point , but I think he will play. If not , your point rolls on to the next league game

  9. The media are absolutely desperate to print a negative headline about our fans out in Lazio.

     

     

    If only they were this desperate to tackle fraud from a certain member club and our governing body.

     

     

    The scum MSM were in hiding when the @rangerstaxcase account made an appearance.

  10. bigrailroadblues on

    Good evening all from the Star Bar. A jolly mixture of desperate huns and smirking Tims. I find the latter more to my taste. We’re definitely better looking. 😂😂

  11. What’s the deal here?

     

    Two almost identical articles, supposedly by different authors or are they?

     

    Are these in fact, the same author?

     

    Is this a case of blatant plagiarism by JJ or by Forbes? Given that the Forbes article was published first….?

     

    Has JJ used simply given the Forbes magazine the article to be published?

     

     

    Certainly, given JJ’s long history of attacking anyone who publishes anything which looks remotely like his work and his current references to the Forbes article without any hint of plagiarism claims, I guess the most obvious conclusion is the authors are in fact one and the same person.

     

    Anyone know the answer?

     

     

    —————————————————————————————————————————————————

     

    Forbes Magazine:

     

     

    Steven Gerrard’s Rangers Announce £11m Losses, In A Manner Designed To Hide Them From The Media

     

    Rangers FC announced accounts at 6.45 p.m. on a Friday, conveniently after the majority of people have stopped looking at the news. This, too, before a huge weekend of Scottish football, with two League Cup semi-finals as well as a full English Premier League program to distract attention.

     

    It’s not quite releasing them 15 minutes before kickoff in a crucial league match, as they did last year, but it is certainly not releasing them in a way that makes life easy for anyone in the media who might want to report on them. This is, of course, not an accident.

     

    I wrote a piece for this very site last year that questioned quite why Rangers might have chosen such timings to release vital information to their supporters, and posited that good news is rarely proclaimed in such a manner. That is as true now as it was then. Last year, the headline news was that the club had lost £14 million, and in a sense, the news this year shows an improvement, as this season Rangers only lost £11 million.

     

     

    Hidden deeper in the report was that the club needs £10 million to keep going to the end of the season, the sort of thing that Rangers fans—who saw their club liquidated in 2012 and relaunched as a new club in the fourth tier of Scottish football—might want to know about. That the club’s Twitter account was silent on the issue, and one would have had to have been perusing Rangers’ website at an unusual hour to be made aware of this, should trouble fans tremendously.

     

    Tucked away in the second to last paragraph of the report, it reads that: “The Board acknowledge that the uncertainty over the level of additional funds that will be required and a lack of a binding debt facility indicate that a material uncertainty exists which may cast doubt over the Group’s ability to continue as a going concern and therefore its ability to realise its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business.” Worrying stuff.

     

    The big positive is the increase in turnover by 63%, which is unquestionably a good thing. More cash going through the club represents more opportunity to make cash, and turnover is now close to what it was in 2011, the last year the club filed accounts before going bust in 2012. Back then, the major issue hanging over the club, and the one that ultimately led to its demise, was their tax problems and mammoth list of creditors. Now, it is their ongoing losses and continuing reliance on share issues and generous benefactors to merely keep the club going.

     

    Revenues jumped, as increased sponsorship and UEFA Europa League qualification boosted the coffers. Crucially, however, Celtic also qualified for the Europa League, and generate plenty of sponsorship themselves, as well as player sales, meaning that the competitive edge of such growth is blunted. Football is unusual in that the success of the business is judged on other factors than a balance sheet. As Rangers fans will tell you, making money doesn’t matter if that means watching Celtic win their record-equalling ninth title in succession, or even worse, a record-breaking tenth.

     

    The simple reality of the matter, however, is that the funding gap to Celtic is essentially insurmountable within the time required to stop the ten unless someone is willing to consciously and deliberately lose tens of millions of pounds to do so. Dave King, the major benefactor of Rangers, is currently losing upwards of £10 million a year to watch Celtic win every trophy, and no matter how big a fan of the club he claims to be, that is completely unsustainable. Now, he must find another £10 million to keep the club solvent until the end of the season.

     

    In the pursuit of Celtic, the Ibrox club have nearly tripled their staff costs in three years. That is way too much for a club that loses as much as Rangers do to keep up, unless they qualify for the Champions League, which would require winning the Scottish league. If they did that, it would justify it, but that is a huge if. Gamblers are plentiful in football—both Rangers and Celtic are sponsored by bookies, as is the Scottish Premiership itself—but currently the odds are 2/1 against Rangers winning the league. Should Rangers not win the league this year, or next year, Dave King would be well within his rights to question the point of it all. Without him, there is nobody else.

     

    The club also spent an estimated £9 million on legal fees, largely on battling Mike Ashley’s Sports Direct for the control of their own merchandising rights. Without going into the incredibly complex details of the case, Rangers lost and now must stump up. That is unusual for most clubs, and Rangers will hope that the worst is now behind them. The inward investment into the club has come via share issues, with the club admitting that the cash was designed specifically to purchase players. Buying players is nothing out of the ordinary for a football club, but for clubs in the Scottish Premiership, it is vital to sell to maintain a healthy balance sheet.

     

    Rangers cannot realistically generate much more revenue from sponsorship, TV broadcasting, match day revenue or merchandising. The only route open to the club—well, the only one other than a wealthy benefactor losing money hand over fist—is to make up the shortfall via player sales, which cannot be squared with their stated goal of winning the Scottish Premiership. Titles are not won by selling your best players halfway through the season, but there is a legitimate threat that the club might not make it to the end of the season without someone departing for cash.

     

    Celtic’s financial figures, for example, reflect the reality of Scottish football in 2019. They turn a profit based on the sale of players or qualification to the Champions’ League, which in turn allows them to reinvest in the squad. Kieran Tierney was brought through the club’s youth academy and sold at a huge profit, while Moussa Dembele, Virgil van Dijk, Victor Wanyama, Stuart Armstrong and others have come through the club and then left at a profit. Next summer, Odsonne Edouard or Kristoffer Ajer could move on to keep the wheels in motion. Rangers fan media, in response to their poor accounts, has played heavily on the line of “if Celtic hadn’t sold XYZ, they’d be losing £10 million too,” without countenancing that selling players is an essential part of the business plan.

     

    Currently—and despite investment similar to Celtic’s—Rangers lack anyone who might represent any significant sell-on value to the club. Alfredo Morelos, their most obvious cash generator, is seen as toxic due to his horrendous disciplinary record, while Ryan Kent, the club’s record signing, has barely featured since joining three months ago. James Tavernier, club captain, is touted as an asset, but has been found out consistently at a higher level than the Scottish Premiership and a significant portion of the Rangers support would question his place in their team, let alone an English Premier League club’s. Throw in that all three are older than Odsonne Edouard and Kristoffer Ajer, Celtic’s most sellable assets, and the outlook becomes yet bleaker.

     

    Inexplicably, in the time since the announcement of their financial reports, stories have appeared that suggest that Rangers will offer new contracts to Allan McGregor, Jermain Defoe and Steven Davis. Parking for one second the irony of McGregor and Davis’ situation—they were also offered new long-term deals in the summer before Rangers were liquidated in 2012—it makes absolutely zero financial sense for a club that should be predicated on selling young talent to the riches of the Premier League to invest valuable wage expenditure on players aged 37, 37 and 34 respectively. The youngest member of their first team squad is 22 and the average age is 27, while Celtic’s is 25 and includes the likes of Jeremie Frimpong (18), Ajer (21) and Edouard (21). The obvious tribal rivalry and pressing need to stop ten-in-a-row aside, Rangers fans could probably better stomach their team coming second if it looked like the club was growing sustainably. This current team needs to win now, or else.

     

     

    —————————————————————————————————————————————————–

     

     

    JohnJames article:

     

     

    A Legitimate Threat

     

    Rangers FC announced accounts at 6-45pm on a Friday, conveniently after the majority of people have stopped looking at the news. This, too, before a huge weekend of Scottish football, with two League Cup semi-finals as well as a full English Premier League program to distract attention. It’s not quite releasing them 15 minutes before kickoff in a crucial league match, as they did last year, but it is certainly not releasing them in a way that makes life easy for anyone in the media who might want to report on them. This is, of course, not an accident.

     

    I wrote a piece for this very site last year that questioned quite why Rangers might have chosen such timings to release vital information to their supporters, and posited that good news is rarely proclaimed in such a manner. That is as true now as it was then. Last year, the headline news was that the club had lost £14 million, and in a sense, the news this year shows an improvement, as this season Rangers only lost £11 million.

     

    Hidden deeper in the report was that the club needs £10m to keep going to the end of the season, the sort of thing that Rangers fans—who have a fairly recent memory of their club ceasing to exist before their eyes—might want to know about. That the club’s Twitter account was silent on the issue, and one would have had to have been perusing Rangers’ website at an unusual hour to be made aware of this, should trouble Bluenoses tremendously.

     

    Tucked away in the second to last paragraph of the report, it reads that: “The Board acknowledge that the uncertainty over the level of additional funds that will be required and a lack of a binding debt facility indicate that a material uncertainty exists which may cast doubt over the Group’s ability to continue as a going concern and therefore its ability to realise its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business.” Worrying stuff.

     

    The big positive is the increase in turnover by 20%, which is unquestionably a good thing. More cash going through the club represents more opportunity to make cash, and turnover is now close to what it was in 2011, the last year the club filed accounts before going bust in 2012. Back then, the major issue hanging over the club, and the one that ultimately led to its demise, was their tax problems and mammoth list of creditors. Now, it is their ongoing losses and continuing reliance on share issues and generous benefactors to merely keep the club going.

     

    Revenues jumped by 63%, as increased sponsorship and UEFA Europa League qualification boosted the coffers. Crucially, however, Celtic also qualified for the Europa League, and generate plenty of sponsorship themselves, as well as player sales, meaning that the competitive edge of such growth is blunted. Football is unusual in that the success of the business is judged on other factors than a balance sheet. As Rangers fans will tell you, making money doesn’t matter if that means watching Celtic win their record-equalling ninth title in succession, or even worse, a record-breaking tenth.

     

    The simple reality of the matter, however, is that the funding gap to Celtic is essentially insurmountable within the time required to stop the ten unless someone is willing to consciously and deliberately lose tens of millions of pounds to do so. Dave King, the major benefactor of Rangers, is currently losing upwards of £10m a year to watch Celtic win every trophy, and no matter how big a fan of the club he claims to be, that is completely unsustainable. Now, he must find another £10m to keep the club solvent until the end of the season.

     

    In the pursuit of Celtic, the Ibrox club have nearly tripled their staff costs in three years. That is way too much for a club that loses as much as Rangers do to keep up, unless they qualify for the Champions’ League, which would require winning the Scottish league. If they did that, it would justify it, but that is a huge if. Gamblers are plentiful in football—both Rangers and Celtic are sponsored by bookies, as is the Scottish Premiership itself—but currently the odds are 2/1 against Rangers winning the league. Should Rangers not win the league this year, or next year, Dave King would be well within his rights to question the point of it all. Without him, there is nobody else.

     

    The club also spent an estimated £9m on legal fees, largely on battling Mike Ashley’s Sports Direct for the control of their own merchandising rights. Without going into the incredibly complex details of the case, Rangers lost and now must stump up. That is unusual for most clubs, and Rangers will hope that the worst is now behind them. The inward investment into the club has come via share issues, with the club admitting that the cash was specifically designed to buy players. Buying players is nothing out of the ordinary for a football club, but for clubs in the Scottish Premiership, it is vital to sell to maintain a healthy balance sheet.

     

    Rangers cannot realistically generate much more revenue from sponsorship, TV broadcasting, match day revenue or merchandising. The only route open to the club—well, the only one other than a wealthy benefactor losing money hand over fist—is to make up the shortfall via player sales, which cannot be squared with their stated goal of winning the Scottish Premiership. Titles are not won by selling your best players halfway through the season, but there is a legitimate threat that the club might not make it to the end of the season without someone departing for cash.

     

    Celtic’s financial figures, for example, reflect the reality of Scottish football in 2019. They turn a profit based on the sale of players or qualification to the Champions’ League, which in turn allows them to reinvest in the squad. Kieran Tierney was brought through the club’s youth academy and sold at a huge profit, while Moussa Dembele, Virgil van Dijk, Victor Wanyama, Stuart Armstrong and others have come through the club and then left at a profit. Next summer, Odsonne Edouard or Kristoffer Ajer could move on to keep the wheels in motion. Rangers fan media, in response to their poor accounts, has played heavily on the line of “if Celtic hadn’t sold XYZ, they’d be losing £10m too”, without countenancing that selling players is an essential part of the business plan.

     

    Currently—and despite investment similar to Celtic’s—Rangers lack anyone who might represent any significant sell-on value to the club. Alfredo Morelos, their most obvious cash generator, is seen as toxic due to his horrendous disciplinary record, while Ryan Kent, the club’s record signing, has barely featured since joining three months ago. James Tavernier, club captain, is touted as an asset, but has been found out consistently at a higher level than the Scottish Premiership and a significant portion of the Rangers support would question his place in their team, let alone an English Premier League club’s. Throw in that all three are older than Odsonne Edouard and Kristoffer Ajer, Celtic’s most sellable assets, and the outlook becomes yet bleaker.

     

    Inexplicably, in the time since the announcement of their financial reports, stories have appeared that suggest that Rangers are considering offering new deals to Defoe, McGregor and Davis. Parking for one second the irony of McGregor and Davis’ situation—they were also offered new long term deals in the summer before Rangers was liquidated in 2012 — it makes absolutely zero financial sense for a club that should be predicated on selling young talent to the riches of the Premier League to invest valuable wage expenditure on players aged 37, 37 and 34 respectively. The youngest member of their first team squad is 22 and the average age is 27, while Celtic’s is 25 and includes the likes of Jeremie Frimpong (18), Ajer (21) and Edouard (21). The obvious tribal rivalry and pressing need to stop ten-in-a-row aside, Rangers fans could probably better stomach their team coming second if it looked like the club was growing sustainably. This current team needs to win now, or else.

     

     

    The article in italic typeface was published in Forbes Magazine. The author is Mike Meehall Wood. Other than adding bold text and removing the hyperlinks to other sites, I have retained the integrity of this excellent article.

     

    Your humble correspondent was the only individual to call the timing and date of the release correctly. The usual suspect, who is so obsessed with maintaining his deluded belief that he is the one-stop shop on all things Sevco, chose to be ‘wise’ after the event. In Scamspotting I anticipated the release in the next few hours. Forty-minutes later I was proven to be correct. Not one of those who lined up to have a kick at me for putting too much faith in a source was prepared to acknowledge this prosaic fact. Having a kick at JJ is a popular pastime on Twitter. Having a kick apropos an article from a site that they read for free on a daily basis is the height of ingratitude. I operate a one-kick block policy. At last count I have blocked fast approaching 2,000 on Twitter.

     

    James Traynor is well versed in the dark arts of PR. Losing £11.3m, after a mendacious unaudited interim report suggested otherwise, is best kept under wraps. On Monday 25th February 2019, the Mark Warburton bread wrapping was bursting at the seams to contain the inflated belief in their Lying King. There was talk of casting the career criminal in bronze. Unfortunately the ‘Projects’ pantry has been stripped bare. The proposed Memorial Wall is now a Wailing Wall.

     

    Should those with only 1872 neurons to their name continue to send their hard-earned cash to the Club 1872 Casino – no matter how much they spend they always end up with less – the least they should expect is a ‘comped’ bronze. As for it’s positioning I am torn between HMP Barlinnie, to give Sons of Struth Co-Founder Sandy Chugg a non drug-induced lift on a cold winter morning, and The Celtic Way. CS King’s seemingly endless appetite for inordinately punishing litigation, the new club’s ball and chain, should be acclaimed by Celtic. It’s an own goal of epic proportions. I calculate that he has fast approaching £14m invested in his vanity project. I am not quite sure how Mr. Hall arrived at a figure of £9m for litigation expenses as by accessing the 2017/2018/2019 accounts the only mention of litigation payments was an interim quantum of £125,000 to Sports Direct.

     

    Should one add the 2019 disclosed £3.6m to the £3m paid to Ashley for Justin Barnes’ – Out of the seven year frying pan into the matching rights fire – contract; the vexatious pursuit of Charles Green and the engagement of a QC to assess their exposure to a letter before claim from solicitors instructed by Craig Whyte, this figure either by accident or design is in the right ball park.

     

    When one reverts to the 25th February of this year, a question is begged as to whether Halloween Houston spiked The Loving Cup with Ecstasy. There is a ‘Summer of Love’ Ashbury Heights feel to the optimism in the following missive:

     

    RANGERS International Football Club PLC unaudited trading results for the six months to 31 December 2018.

     

    The results for the six months to 31 December 2018 represent a significantly improved financial performance, driven by a strong run in European football, which has impacted on prize monies earned and commercial opportunities, as well as increasing the number of home games in the six month period from 14 to 21 compared to last year.

     

    The operating profit before player amortisation has increased from £0.7m to £6.7m.

     

    This period also includes an issue of £12.6m of ordinary shares, which raised £1.5m in cash and converted £11.1m of interest-free loans to equity.

     

    The net impact of these factors is that the operating result increased, from an operating loss of £1.1m in the comparative period, to an operating profit of £3.8m. Given that the bulk of the Club’s income falls into the first six months of any season, the Board is satisfied that the results for the full year will be good, with the Club forecasting to be close to break-even for EBITDA for the year.

     

    During the period the Club posted a gain on the sale of player registrations amounting to £2.8m. Amortisation of the playing squad increased in line with the investment in it, from £1.8m to £3.0m.

     

    As a result of the above, the Club posted an overall profit for the period of £5.2m.

     

    The analogy that comes readily to mind is a father who has let down his teenage daughter with a Xmas gift of ‘My Little Pony’ who promises to make up for his faux pas with a more apposite gift for her birthday on Halloween. The flea-bitten donkey he tried to pass off under the cover of night, despite claims that he was flush, resulted in a Halloween that would never be forgotten.

     

    The new club as expected put a sorry Hearts to the sword yesterday. From what I have seen of the thugs of Midlothian they are credible candidates for relegation this season. There would be a delicious irony if Naismith, who left the new club in the lurch as he had no desire to play lower league football, found himself doing same. It could not happen to a better WATPFTP knuckle-dragger.

     

    Flat track bully Morelos bagged a brace against what passed for a defence at Hampden yesterday. HMFC might as well have put out cones and invited Morelos to beat the keeper from 30 yards. As Mr. Hall wrote, Tavernier has been exposed as an average journeymen who is prone to costly errors. His prowess at penalties, one of which was awarded when Defoe dived in anticipation of a tackle, would be less of a draw in a league with VAR. He’s going nowhere at Xmas. As for Mad Dog, Gerrard kept him on the bench at Ibrox until he had nothing to lose. He is as toxic as Mr. Hall suggests. Will the rookie manager in his sophomore season risk him against Scott Brown in the first meeting of the Glasgow clubs in a Cup Final? I contend that the decision will be taken out of Gerrard’s hands. If there is any interest, scouts know that a Glasgow Derby is the perfect opportunity to assess a player. Should he solicit a red card all will be lost. CS King’s last spin of the casino wheel might end in tears.

     

    The sale of the new club’s only valuable commodity is mandatory. The dilemma facing CS King is whether to accept a £10m punt, or put his hand in his pocket to fish out another £5m and await more. The career criminal’s patience and cash reserves are wearing thin.

     

    After dealing with questions with the ferocity of flatus from a dead sheep at their AGM, the Cup Final on the 8th December will soon follow. CS King’s elation will be short-lived. Celtic will wipe the floor with them.

     

    Peter Lawwell’s Celtic have a sustainable business model. CS King as is his wont has thrown caution to the wind. CS King’s usual recourse, to litigation, has not had the desired result. A defeat in the Cup Final is just the beginning of the bad news for King. His vanity mask will soon lie crumpled on the floor; a kid’s discarded paper pirate hat at Halloween springs readily to mind. Taking a bath at Rangers*, £34m and counting, is a high price to pay to wash away four decades of corporate grift.

  12. ARMED Lazio thugs attacked a bar full of Celtic fans and stabbed one Hoops supporter in the back of the leg.

     

    The hooded hooligans – who had their faces covered by masks and scarves – ambushed the Flann O’Brien bar at around 11.30pm (Rome time).

     

     

    Stabbed in the leg…

  13. macjay1 for Neil Lennon on

    Celtic sites.

     

     

    4. Celtic Quick News | Celtic news not lazy journalism

     

    Celtic Quick News | Celtic news not lazy journalismAbout Blog Welcome to the new look Celtic Quick News where you will find the latest Celtic news and features, posted 365 days a year!

     

    Frequency about 42 posts per week.

     

    Since Oct 2011

     

    Blog celticquicknews.co.uk

     

    Facebook fans 11.1K ⋅ Social Engagement 85ⓘ ⋅ Domain Authority 48ⓘ

     

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    Number one is the frightful Celtic Newsnow.

     

     

    Ok

     

    We need another 41 to make up the weekly average.

  14. Well I never…

     

     

    13 men and boys have been arrested after Kilmasonic v Sevco game in August.

     

     

    Ffs talk about taking thier time.

     

     

    Still better late than never.

     

     

    😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

     

     

    D. :)

  15. AuroraBorealis79 on

    Great news that Collum McGregor has signed a new contract. Now get I wanna be… signed up ; )

  16. BBC radio Scotland is reporting that 2 Celtic fans are in hospital in Rome following knive attack by masked men.

     

     

    Injuries are not life threatening

  17. Alasdair MacLean on

    Ave Ave,

     

     

    You need to have a closer look at the JJ article.

     

     

    He provides a copy and paste of the Forbes article – in an italic blue font.

     

    At the start of his own article he explains that he has done this – removing only links etc.

  18. Alasdair MacLean on

    I’ll save you the time!

     

    Copy and paste:

     

     

    “The article in italic typeface was published in Forbes Magazine. The author is Mike Meehall Wood. Other than adding bold text and removing the hyperlinks to other sites, I have retained the integrity of this excellent article.”

  19. Thanks Alasdair. I missed that bit when I read it. I guess you need to read more closely, rather than skim read.

     

    Phew! At least that makes sense now.

  20. Melvyn and a few pals talk of

     

     

    The Treaty of Limerick

     

     

    Beeb radio 4 9am onwards

     

     

    HH

  21. Italian ultra fans showing they are once again animals. Stabbing somebody is a right of passage within these groups. They aren’t brave warriors by any means. Just cowards who enact violence on the unsuspecting.Lets not forget the lifechanging injuries sustained by Liverpool fan Sean Cox as he minded his own business.

     

     

    It’s happened to Spurs fans and many others. You will see zombies celebrating this. “Battered everywhere they go”

     

     

    Just remember this my fellow tims…. This is all they have.

     

    This is the ugly face of a fanbase that has been denied any success on the park for years. All they have is to celebrate child abuse and hooliganism.

     

    Think of that every time Celtic lift another trophy. Relish it.

  22. If Porto are taking this game seriously tonight yet Sevco still manage to get a result, then we ought to stop kidding ourselves that winning the League is a formality.

     

    The Bookies ( William Hill ) have Sevco as favourites.

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