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Test for an emerging Celtic team

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We play plenty of no-win games, where all that can be achieved is an expected result and the avoidance of a humiliating loss, or draw.  Tonight is different.  Tonight we play the team who won the Europa League last year and who are significantly better resourced that Celtic.  When Celtic entered this group, opposition from Spain, Italy and France ensured that expectations were never going to get wildly out of proportion.  Indeed, after Sion, defeat in Madrid and a solitary point at home to Udinese, many expectations were of an early exit.

But, after four games, Celtic have it all to play for.  Two solid performances against Rennes delivered four points and a big performance this evening would give Celtic an excellent chance of progressing to the business end of European football.

This is a test for a young and emerging Celtic team.  Don’t underestimate them….

Read the unofficial Celtic v Atletico Madrid programme here.

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  1. The Battered Bunnet says:

     

     

    30 November, 2011 at 17:08

     

     

    “From each man according to his ability, to each according to his need.”

     

     

    It’s not a bad old maxim, and embraces a fondness for collective betterment.

     

     

    Between 1997 and 2007, according to ONS, productivity in the private sector improved by 20% – output up, cost flat.

     

     

    During the same period, productivity in the public sector reduced by 0.3% – output flat, cost up.

     

     

    Question: Are private sector workers more able?

     

     

    87% of public sector workers will receive a Defined Benefits or Salary Related pension. 12% of private sector workers will.

     

     

    56% of private sector workers have no pension provision, while 32% pay into a private scheme that provides a lump sum from which an annuity is bought. Annuity rates are currently below 4% of lump sum. The average private pension pot will provide a lump sum of £30,000, which will deliver an annuity of about £1200 per year.

     

     

    Question: Do private sector pensioners need less?

     

     

    All very glib, but there is an issue. The public sector doesn’t work as hard as the private, but enjoys better terms. That’s not my opinion btw, that’s what all the measures of work in the UK confirm. The public sector doesn’t need to work as hard. It doesn’t need to return a profit. It isn’t in competition. So why bother?

     

     

    I really do get the contractual bit, and appreciate why those who walked out today did so, but there needs to be an honesty in the dialogue, something missing in my view from the Government’s side during the 2007 settlement, and perhaps from both sides currently.

     

     

    On balance, our public sector colleagues are better paid, for doing less, and better provided for in retirement, than the majority of employees in the country.

     

     

    If that’s the kind of nation we want, fair enough, but it’s not a particularly easy position to square with reality.

     

     

    He

     

    ——————————————————————————————

     

     

    a very glib statement about public sector being better paid for doing less and better provided for in retirement. Can you provide proof that the majority of public servants are enjoying this? And what do you include as employees? The bankers, company directors, etc ?

  2. Ah jist Checked..

     

     

    It’s True~ That is Tonight’s Team Selection.

     

     

    Wull Lenny, Triumph?

     

     

    Did He mak the Proper Tweak…??

     

     

    Hmmmmmmm..

     

     

    Like the Photographer said tae the Bishop…

     

     

    “We must wait and see how things Develop.”

     

     

    Kojo

  3. The Battered Bunnet on

    Do your own research Ron, and come back with an argument.

     

     

    I can point you to the Office for National Statistics for starters.

     

     

    Go for it.

  4. West Wales Celt on

    TBB:

     

    Lots of public sector workers are low paid and their pensions will merely prevent future reliance on benefits.

     

    The real issue is not public v private.

     

    The real question is why ordinary working people are paying for the banks’ profligacy whilst tax avoiding Huns and the rich are not…

  5. Not surprised NL has changed the side for the game tonight, reverting to a more cautious Euro approach which worked against Rennes.

     

     

    St Mirren in comparison to Athletico Madrid, is chalk and cheese.

     

     

    Mon the Hoops

  6. The Battered Bunnet says:

     

     

    30 November, 2011 at 17:08

     

     

    “The public sector doesn’t work as hard as the private, but enjoys better terms. That’s not my opinion btw, that’s what all the measures of work in the UK confirm. The public sector doesn’t need to work as hard. It doesn’t need to return a profit. It isn’t in competition.”

     

     

    Sorry, rubbish. I dount many teachers, nurses, care assistants etc etc etc would agree with your assertion either.

     

     

    The problem is too many people repeat the headlines they see in the Daily Mail without challenging or questioning them. I work in the public sector – there are many wasters but there also many, many hard workers. I worked in the private sector as well – again, many hard workers but also many wasters there as well.

     

     

    By all means, let’s have a discussion about pension rights but please dont generalise as our right wing press and politicians do.

     

     

    PS Maybe the terms that some public sectors workers are on are the ones the private sector should be aspiring to, rather than trying to strip away the contractual obligations given to the public sector in order to match the often ridiculous terms available to many private sector workers (other than those at the top of the ladder who have their noses in the trough).

     

     

    anyway, c’mon the Celtic!

  7. Citibhoy Shoulder to Shoulder with Neil Lennon on

    WestWalesCelt…

     

     

    What constitutes an “ordinary working person” in your label intensive world

  8. bournesouprecipe

     

     

    I’ll speculate here and suggest that I can’t see it being 4-2-3-1.

     

     

    Ki, Kayal and Wanyama will be in the midfield with Sammi and Forrest wide. It’s a straight 4-5-1 – a far more difficult job for Stokes this time round. Sammi would be a better bet, but he’ll surely be playing on the left. Square pegs, round holes?

     

     

    My feeling is Lennon is being too cautious.

  9. Citibhoy Shoulder to Shoulder with Neil Lennon on

    GSCBHOY

     

     

    if you are at the top of the ladder are you automatically a trougher.?

     

     

    IF so we should stop anyone getting to the top of the ladder. Simples. The logic of Pol Pot.

  10. Ah kin see whit Lenny is Up Tae…

     

     

    Although, If He wur Me..and Ah wiz No Me ,but Him

     

     

    Then.. Ah wid…

     

     

    Hiv Used… Broonie.. as Extra Bulwark fur his Middy…if that is whit is

     

    Behind.. Lenny’s Thinkin’

     

     

    No Ki..

     

     

    Ki is Mair oaf a Decoration.. than a Bulwark..

     

     

     

    In Ma Opinion.a

     

     

    Kojo

  11. The Battered Bunnet says:

     

    30 November, 2011 at 17:08

     

     

    Private sector workers get paid on averge higher salaries. Fact.

     

     

    If you CHOOSE to work the longer hours in private sector then that is an individual decision. If the Public sector just shut up and said nothimg and took these unfair changes then understand it has a knock on effect on the private sector pay and more hours.

     

     

    Private sector has no protection to unfair conditions and should back the strikes seeing as the gap between the 2 can never be far apart. It is simple, WE ARE ALL BEING SCREWED !

     

     

    After taxes and utility bills the average person has hardly anything. There is enough in the budget but they spend it on banks and defence contracts on wars we don’t profit from.

     

     

    Any ways like the team. Would have Hooper in with Stokes but can see the reasoning in more defensive fromation at start against top passing team.

  12. Citibhoy Shoulder to Shoulder with Neil Lennon says:

     

    30 November, 2011 at 17:26

     

     

    Just as not every Rangers supporter is a hun, not everyone at the top of the ladder has their nose in the trough. However, on both cases, there are too many of the bad kind!

  13. The battered bunnet.

     

     

    ‘The public sector doesn’t work as hard as the private, but enjoys better terms’

     

     

    Is that so?

     

     

    And the proof can be found where??

     

     

    At best you’re pretty inaccurate and downright insulting to people who work very hard at worst.

  14. up_over

     

     

    Don’t reckon he has any option, to be honest.

     

     

    4-5-1 it is, ( or 4-2-3-1 for the more tactically pedanTIC )

     

     

    This side we are playing can cut open Real Madrid et all.

     

     

    A draw or better is a great result.

  15. West Wales Celt on

    Citibhoy:

     

    The stats on the proportion of wealth in the hands of a tiny proportion of the population are readily available.

     

    Similarly, the huge amount of potential income which the rich don’t pay is well documented.

     

    Anyone paying standard rates of tax are certainly ordinary working people but I see little point in a ‘when does a grain of salt become a pile’ debate…

     

     

    Could I ask you a question?

     

    Do you think it fair to attack the pensions of public sector workers whilst the rich don’t pay their taxes?

  16. The Battered Bunnet on

    gscbhoy

     

     

    You make some fair points, and it is difficult to compare like for like, but the old assumption that public sector was lower paid but better provided for is no longer true, and hasn’t been for about 10 years.

     

     

    We should probably leave the teachers out of it because there is simply no competing with 13 odd weeks annual leave. It is unprecedented and needs to change. Our kids could do with more teacher time, more languages, more science, more PE, but they finish at 3.45pm each day and have no schooling for 30% of the year. Meantime, education in this country slips ever lower down the international rankings. Let’s not talk about teaching.

     

     

    Try the retail or hospitality trade for a laugh. And of course, many of the old public sector jobs – Waste and the likes – are now privately tendered and provided.

     

     

    There is a good point to be made that the Public Sector should set an example. Health and Safety would be a good one, Environmental leadership, and employment law also need the public sector to take the lead. Where we aspire to a better society, the public sector is able to take the lead, whether on bigger issues such as those mentioned, or indeed more personal ones such as terms and conditions of employment. what is a living wage? What is an adequate pension? This of course needs to be checked by affordability. What we aspire to and what we can achieve are not always balanced.

     

     

    The corollary to that of course is when society needs to address challenges, where for example an aspiration has proven to be out of reach despite best efforts, then the public sector again can take a lead in addressing it. Like now, for example.

     

     

    Must dash now though. There’s a group of overpaid, underworked and well provided for young men out in the rain that need my support :¬)

  17. The Battered Bunnet says:

     

    30 November, 2011 at 17:08

     

     

    87% of public sector workers will receive a Defined Benefits or Salary Related pension. 12% of private sector workers will.

     

     

    56% of private sector workers have no pension provision, while 32% pay into a private scheme that provides a lump sum from which an annuity is bought. Annuity rates are currently below 4% of lump sum. The average private pension pot will provide a lump sum of £30,000, which will deliver an annuity of about £1200 per year.

     

     

    Question: Do private sector pensioners need less?

     

     

    All very glib, but there is an issue. The public sector doesn’t work as hard as the private, but enjoys better terms. That’s not my opinion btw, that’s what all the measures of work in the UK confirm. The public sector doesn’t need to work as hard. It doesn’t need to return a profit. It isn’t in competition. So why bother?

     

     

     

    1. No, they do not need less, they simply appear to cater for their retirement less. The amount I pay into my Public Sector pension would provide me with your quoted lump sum within about 15 years of starting it (or within abour 9 years from now). That private sector employees disregard that which has been public knowledge for the last 20 years is entirely their own choice.

     

     

    2. Erm, that is entirely your opinion. You’ve read that productivity fell in one sector but not the other, and somehow decide that it must mean that the latter is working harder than the former. What the statistics really say is: the public sector’s ‘output’ is not as great as it was, whereas the private sector’s output has risen. Anything else taken from those stats is entirely opinion. The ONS productivity stats are on a sector basis and not on an individual performance basis.

  18. The Battered Bunnet says:

     

     

    30 November, 2011 at 17:21

     

     

    Do your own research Ron, and come back with an argument.

     

     

    I can point you to the Office for National Statistics for starters.

     

     

    Go for it.

     

     

     

    share

     

     

     

    ——-

     

     

    can’t be arsed trying to understand a government stastictics site, do please tell us what you thinkwhat you think

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