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TRFC submit incomplete Annual Return

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Companies House published the long overdue Annual Return for The Rangers Football Club Ltd (previously Sevco Scotland Ltd) today.  Although only received by Companies House yesterday (12 Sep 13) it was dated 29th May 2013, however, the submission was incomplete.

A company is required to detail all their shareholders since their previous Annual Return (or as in this instance, since formation).  Companies House say the Annual Return must detail “the name of every shareholder (or joint-shareholders) who has ceased to be a shareholder since the made-up date of the previous annual return (or in the case of a first return, since the incorporation of the company)”.

The only shareholder detailed on this Annual Return is Rangers International Football Club PLC (RIFC PLC).  RIFC PLC was not formed until 16 November 2012, nearly four months after Sevco Scotland Ltd was formed, so could not have been a founding shareholder.

And there’s more…….

The Rangers Football Club Ltd issued a Statement of Capital to Companies House, dated 31 October 2012, showing the same number of shares in issue as this Annual Return (33,415,200), some two weeks before Rangers International was formed.  The Statement of Capital was submitted by Caroline Nicholls of Field Fisher Waterhouse LLP, who should be in a position to assist the directors.

I’d never really given any consideration to who owned Sevco Scotland Ltd  prior to the shares being consumed by Rangers International, but this omission is curious.  The story will move on now with auditors Deloittes taking centre stage.  They have plenty on their plate prior to signing off the PLC’s accounts so may be happy to turn a blind eye to the reporting requirements of a subsidiary company.  Companies House already have an active issue over submissions for Sevco 5088 Ltd, it remains to be seen whether this one passes below the radar.

This is all so unnecessary as I am sure the correct information would be perfectly appropriate and in good order.

Can you imagine what we would be doing if our ‘club’ was being run in this manner?  This story is being played out while all those who should be asking questions are being distracted by a player betting against his own club!

In the grand scheme of things it doesn’t matter if Ian Black hedges against himself, or what embarrassingly light punishment he receives.  The real story is so much bigger, it is being written in large type, visible from the moon landings, but the football authorities appear happy to stand back and let events take their course.

No looks of surprise next time around – from anyone.

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  1. Owen 10:50 Apologies if I came across as over critical of Celtic it was not my intention, just trying to point out that they are the only body that could do anything to prevent the re-selling of tickets but there is no incentive for them to do so, so why should they bother? My son is a regular attender at games but due to Uni commitments and working most Saturdays he has reluctantly not purchased a ST for the last two years. He asked me to try and get him a package as he is on holiday at the moment. He will be disappointed just as I will be disappointed with my fellow ST holders if I see any for sale on any touting websites.

     

     

    On the upside, looking forward to a sold out CP for all three games.

     

     

    More money for Neil’s transfer Warchest in January :-)

     

     

     

    ps Last!

  2. BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS forza Oscar and Mackenzie on

    Late again.

     

     

    And I was so looking forward to the 1690 post.

     

     

    I was gonna print it off and frame it,put it on the wall in my favourite Kilwinning pub when I get back in a fortnight!

  3. bognorbhoyle oscar in my thoughts on

    thomson sports have packages for home game against barca from £179

     

    how many would they have 100 /200 ? how many will sell ,what happens to the ones they dont sell? just a thought.

     

     

    they also have tickets from£17 for a.c away ……if you buy their package from £355

  4. Paul – methinks some of the shareholders may involve a couple of the colours we so like!

     

     

    What I am really interested in from Deloitte’s is how they will sign off against them being a “going concern”.

     

     

    More fun to come…..

  5. godblesstommyburns on

    Am I the only one who watched “Peaky Blinders ” last night who thought that the Thomas Shelby lead character has an uncanny resemblance to the great Broony ?

  6. BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS forza Oscar and Mackenzie on

    PAUL67

     

     

    Have those accounts been signed off by auditors?

     

     

    Seems to be a lack of oversight and diligence if that is the case.

  7. The huge demand (which is great) for the CL packages means that it’s one of those situations where whatever the club did some supporters would be unhappy.

     

     

    If you have a ticket be happy, if not take some solace in the fact that once again we’re generating a huge amount of excitement and people want to make sure they’re there in person.

  8. canamalar prays Oscar can do it again on

    vclxi,

     

    Tell yer bhoy to take the chance, there’s always a good chance he’ll get one, last seasons barca game my wee brother got a call to go to the hospital just as we reached Celtic park cause his baby bhoy was ill(it turned out ok) so a very lucky Tim who took the chance got his ticket. Not every ticket for sale at the ground is by touts or to make a buck so don’t generalise or judge ST holders selling tickets at the stadium.

  9. The SFA have been asked to look into the sevco accounts fiasco. They have done so and issued (the) rangers with a 3 month suspension from playing any football matches, backdated till January 4th. And told not to do it again, or they`ll issue them with another don`t do it again notice. They then stated that they will keep issuing them with don`t do it again notices until they don`t do it again.

  10. BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS forza Oscar and Mackenzie on

    Talking about The Stranglers earlier,1976 was the year that saw the birth of the punk movement..

     

     

    Ok,we can argue semantics about The New York Dolls,The Tubes,even Velvet Underground.

     

     

    Best-selling track that year? Save all your kisses for me….

     

     

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. From The Herald

     

     

    Not Fade Away 1976: Anarchy In The UK, by The Sex Pistols

     

     

    Not Fade Away: 60 years, 60 songs

     

    Teddy Jamieson

     

    Monday 9 September 2013

     

    Not Fade Away 1976: Anarchy In The UK, by The Sex Pistols.

     

     

     

    The Sex Pistols

     

    “Anger is an energy.” John Lydon, Rise, 1986

     

     

    “Be Childish. Be irresponsible. Be disrespectful. Be everything this society hates.” Malcolm McLaren

     

     

    I was too young for punk. Too young and well-behaved. And too conservative. In 1977 I wasn’t singing God Save the Queen, I was waving my Union Jack in front of the Queen when she visited the New University of Ulster in Northern Ireland (there was a picture of me on page six of the Irish edition of the Sun the next day).

     

     

    At the time punk was noises off for me, so my knowledge of it is inevitably retrospective. There’s a danger in that; the danger that you embrace the myth unquestioningly. That you take punk’s rebellion, its rejection, its dystopian energy at face value.

     

     

    But then the alternative is you deconstruct the whole thing away. You listen to Anarchy In The UK and hear it as little more than a decent rock song with an unusual vocal and “angry” lyrics. And then you look at chart positions and sales figures and ask how big a deal was punk anyway?

     

     

    From this distance it’s easy to diminish it. But context matters. The Sex Pistols were a band, yes, but they also represented – however fuzzily – something else. Anger, anarchy, a rejection of a culture that was sclerotic, failing (this is the seventies, a different country, one of strikes and bombs and the National Front on the rise).

     

     

    “At the time, I remember that punk rock wasn’t just music or going to the right clubs or wearing the right clothes (which is not to say that these matters were not absorbing or important),” punk’s pre-eminent chronicler Jon Savage wrote back in 1981. “It was or seemed more: an all-in critique of, an all-out attack on things as they were and things as they were going to be.

     

     

    “Apocalypse now. Serious stuff, playing with, and stoking up, real fire.”

     

     

    Who got burnt? Punks themselves of course. When you sing about violence it’s little surprise that, as Johnny Rotten found out far too often, violence would be aimed back at you. But the fact that a few sweary words on telly could instigate front page disgust (“The Filth and The Fury” as the Daily Mirror headlined its report of the band’s notorious interview with Bill Grundy) and inspire church elders and council leaders to try to ban you suggest how far the cultural sea change that the 1960s generation was supposed to have instigated had already ebbed.

     

     

    It’s difficult to look back now, of course, and properly see punk’s original vision. And in truth it was always likely to be an unstable signifer anyway. In its short history it meant so many different things. Punk philosophy – to critics little more than a mixture of half-baked situationist ideas and nihilist posturing – inevitably became more and more distorted as more and more tried to lay claim to it. Punk became a cartoon, a caricature. At worst it became reactionary (though, to be fair, punks also played an important role in the Rock Against Racism campaign).

     

     

    But in December 1976 – though it took me a few years to realise it – the Pistols represented something new, something fresh and something hard.

     

     

    Or hard-ish. As Garry Mulholland argues in his book This Is Uncool: The 500 Greatest Singles Since Punk and Disco (the key text for what’s to come in the next two decades in this blog, by the way), what strikes you about Anarchy In The UK is just how knowing it is. “The best thing about Anarchy … – the thing that makes it so other, so removed from the rock of the time (hell, the rock of now) – is that it’s really very, very funny about very serious stuff. I mean, Johnny Rotten ushers us into a brave new world with, of all things, a Sid James cackle.”

     

     

    There’s a prescience to it too. When Rotten(Lydon) sings “Your future dream is a shopping scheme” he was time-travelling into the future. And if you stretch a point you could argue that the song’s last word “Destroy” was a prophecy of what would happen when the woman waiting in the wings took power in the 1979 general election.

     

     

    I was too young for punk. Maybe I’m too old for it now. But I’m also old enough to have enjoyed what followed – the sense in the late seventies and early eighties that pop music had been reborn, had been rebooted. That its sense of mission had been re-established (though humour was allowed).

     

     

    The sound of Anarchy does sound tame in a way now that it just couldn’t have back then, when it came couched in headlines, spiked collars and bondage trousers. But even so you can still feel a shiver of something when you hear that laugh and those opening words, “I am an anti-Christ …” Childish, irresponsible, disrespectful. It’s all of those. That’s what’s great about it.

     

     

     

     

    Other Contenders

     

     

    Police and Thieves, Junior Murvin

     

     

    Sir Duke, Stevie Wonder

     

     

    Young Hearts Run Free, Candi Staton

     

     

    Turn the Beat Around, Vicki Sue Robinson

     

     

    New Rose, The Damned

     

     

    I Want You, Marvin Gaye

     

     

    Don’t Fear the Reaper, Blue Oyster Cult

     

     

    Hejira, Joni Mitchell

     

     

    So It Goes, Nick Lowe

     

     

    Love and Affection, Joan Armatrading

     

     

    Silly Love Songs, Wings (just for the brass lines)

     

     

     

     

    NME Single of the Year – The Boys are Back in Town, Thin Lizzy

     

     

    And the best-selling single of 1976 – Save Your Kisses For Me, Brotherhood Of Man

  11. BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS forza Oscar and Mackenzie on

    GEORDIE MUNRO 1123

     

     

    That’s cos they never happened-did you miss that debate?!

     

     

    BLANTYREKEV and ACGR saved a few quid though….

  12. Does anyone know if it’s possible to buy premium tickets for UCL on a single match basis? Been trying to get through to ticket office for an age.

  13. NegAnon2, the going concern issue. There are two viable alternatives:

     

     

    They propose another share issue.

     

     

    They present the sale and leaseback proposition.

     

     

    Both are fraught with practical difficulties but this is an exercise in getting a tick in the box.

     

     

    BOBBY MURDOCH’S CURLED-UP, no, these are not accounts.

  14. BOBBY MURDOCH'S CURLED-UP WINKLEPICKERS forza Oscar and Mackenzie on

    PAUL67

     

     

    Apologies for the mix-up!

     

     

    Not been down the pub yet,brain still dormant….

  15. saltires en sevilla supporting wee oscar on

    Hunskelper-good shout I might accept a situation where 1,000 tickets are offered to a list of regular attenders ( i.e. circumstances mean season tickets not viable) – on reflection I would support that. Overall, confident season ticket holders ensure the remaining tickets will go to good Celts.

     

     

    HT – yes- I hope John P can get in about that conflict to avoid any repeat.

     

     

    HH

  16. leftclicktic oscar in our thoughts on

    Paul thank you for printinting those fine words again :))

     

     

    “sale and leaseback”.

     

    ps

     

    from twitter

     

     

     

    “For those queuing for Arbroath tickets today just off Paisley Rd West here’s something you may have forgot” http://youtu.be/BgomX3qD-iA

  17. Bobby lol

     

     

     

    Aye some poor charity is missing out on 20 bucks cos Paul didn’t get with the program;)

  18. The argument over tickets for UCL games could be helped with Audlheid’s Membership scheme and overseas ST ideas.

     

     

    hh

  19. James Forrest is praying for The Unconquerable Oscar Knox on

    Agree that the football authorities are now placed in a bad spot.

     

     

    But I am going to point out – again – that those “football authorities” now include our own chief executive, in a position of enormous responsibility and power.

     

     

    If the “football authorities” allow this club to continue running its affairs in this shabby – dare I say (I dare, I dare) criminal – manner, then part of the blame for that is going to lie at the door of Celtic Park.

     

     

    We are going in to the Champions League groups severely under strength. A personal opinion of mine, I know, but one I hold to. The manager has not been given the support he required, or deserved, or wanted … and all in the name of us playing by the rules, keeping our house in order, balancing the books.

     

     

    If Peter Lawwell inflicts that on our club in his position as CEO, yet allows the club operating out of Ibrox and calling itself Rangers to act in a different way in his post at the SFA then, frankly, he needs to give one of them up because he’s trying to square the circle, and it won’t wash.

     

     

    This is the consequence of his taking a higher role on the SFA board. He has married himself to the fate of Rangers, pure and simple, and no amount of obfuscation or spin will change that simple fact.

     

     

    We have railed against the power on this site until we are blue in the face.

     

     

    Peter Lawwell is part of that power now. We cannot criticise that power without acknowledging that simple fact.

  20. LiviBhoy - God bless wee Oscar on

    bjmac

     

     

    Celtic are perfect for the membershp ticket scheme. The old board had such a scheme and they were hopeless!

     

     

    LB

  21. Hi, the club knows who they sell every ticket to , thus they could have issued letters offering packages to the folks with the most purchases outside season ticket holders. Rewarding people who come along regularily but are currently not season ticket holders.

     

     

    All of these folks are potentially future season ticket holders and everyone else would see the more tickets you buy the more chance you have of getting tickets.

     

     

    Simples (well it is to me )

  22. Junior (13) was listening to me moaning about the internet fee, that’s added on buying the CL tickets. He asked why the club can’t just add “permission” to our SB swipe cards ?

     

     

    Any reason why this couldn’t be done ?

  23. The Battered Bunnet on

    In other news, a Judge sitting in his Tax and Chancery Court, noted the following in a recent preliminary determination:

     

     

    “….it should nevertheless not be overlooked that a modern professional football club is not a “club”, in the sense of an unincorporated association of members who join together in pursuit of a common purpose, but a commercial enterprise whose function is to generate profits for its shareholders.”

     

     

    What he didn’t say was what happens when such commercial enterprises are consigned to liquidation, but I’m pretty sure the sharper minds in the Scots football domain will be able to infer an appropriate extension.

  24. For those of you who didn’t get any tickets this morning still 1 night home game packages left on Thomsons Sports £179 thank you very much

  25. I fit were not for the digital age EVERYTHING would have been swept under the carpet.

     

     

    Scottish society, the SFA et al……it is what it is. We just need to work around the construct because we will never change it so long as we are the 18% minority.

     

     

    There will always be a team of some description playing at the slowly decaying orcdome. They represent the 80% after all.

     

     

    The important aspect of all of this is tat we continue to reinforce our superior financial and football position as the pre eminent European football force within Scotland so as when the latest incarnation of the orcs appear…….we are in a completely unassailable position.

     

     

    Purported talk by DD of a resurgent orcs is fanciful. On good day they will be about as strong as mid table team. No bank will touch them and no “billionaire” will put a coin of real money into them. The bigot dome already needs tens of millions spent on it.

     

     

    Its over for them. All we have is the wait until they accept their fait accompli.

     

     

    From being one vote away from ejection from the SFA in the 1950’s

     

     

    From being less than 24 hours from liquidation by the orc bank in the 1990’s

     

     

    To being the unassailed European superpower of Scottish football in the millennium

     

     

    Revenge is a dish best served cold :)

     

     

     

    “Your Grandchildren will be Celtic supporters”

  26. BMCUW

     

     

     

     

    11:50 on 13 September, 2013

     

    stood next to him in some chain pub on the kings road many years ago.He had a brandy a glass of white and two blondes by his person

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